To Die For (1995)

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Based on a novel by Joyce Maynard, with a script by Buck Henry, and directed by Gus Van Zant, To Die For combines dark comedy, traditional drama and “mockumentary” interviews to very entertaining results.

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Nicole Kidman plays Suzanne Stone, a local cable weather girl with huge dreams of finding fame and fortune as the next Barbara Walters. What Suzanne lacks in talent and intelligence, she makes up for in manipulation and ruthlessness, and nothing, including her marriage, will get in her way.

The movie commences with Suzanne marrying Larry Moretto (Matt Dillon), the biggest catch in Little Hope, New Hampshire. It’s not certain why Suzanne falls for Larry other than she thinks his close Italian-American family has mob connections, which can help her achieve her goals. Larry is lovable, albeit a bit dim, and completely clueless to Suzanne’s calculating ways. All Larry wants to do is settle down in Little Hope, run the family restaurant and makes lots of babies with Suzanne.

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Of course, Suzanne has different plans. Despite her lack of journalistic and television experience she’s able to charm a local cable TV manager in giving her a gofer job. She parlays this lowly position into a regular stint as a weather girl. It’s not long before she recruits some local teens in producing a subpar TV special called “Teens Speak Out.” Jimmy (Joaquin Phoenix), Russell (Casey Affleck) and Lydia (Alison Folland) are the hardly the type-A achievers you’d expect on a teen-oriented TV show. They’re inarticulate and not good students, but apparently being in awe of Suzanne is the only job requirement necessary.

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Larry gets a bit fed up with Suzanne’s ambitions and tells her it’s time to get busy with making babies. But Suzanne will have none of this. She tells her mother-in-law that being pregnant on TV is a career killer. Oh, if only Suzanne had waited a decade or so. Today, baby bumps and stupidly named off-spring are the “must have” for any celebrity. You can even become famous for simply having kids.

Suzanne realizes Larry, and his meddling family, is getting in her way of achieving TV success. There is only one thing she can do, recruit Jimmy, Russell and Lydia in bumping off her husband. Now having an affair with the devious, yet seductive Suzanne, Jimmy does the deadly deed. This local murder becomes national news making Suzanne the “star” she always desired and she revels in her tabloid notoriety. Not surprisingly, the hapless Jimmy is not so lucky.

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However, Larry’s family is very wise to Suzanne’s scheming ways and they make sure Suzanne gets her comeuppance. The mousy Lydia, who Suzanne disdained as “white trash,” tells her story in a television interview and becomes famous in her own right.

Every performance in To Die For is near perfection. Matt Dillon is very good as a man who’s happy to have the prettiest girl in town but really wants the homebound hausfrau. Illeana Douglas as Larry’s sister Janice is dryly sarcastic and figures out Suzanne’s BS early on in the game. Both Phoenix and Affleck show a great deal of promise early in their careers in their respective roles.

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But To Die For is truly Nicole Kidman’s film. With Kidman’s acting chops, Suzanne Stone is hugely self-absorbed but not very self-aware. Her calculation and cunning is as transparent as a plate of glass, but her telegenic beauty and media-savvy charm succeeds in drawing you closer. Despite ourselves, we want Suzanne Stone to be in front of the camera. Kidman won a very deserved Golden Globe for her portrayal of Suzanne Stone. She is simply a bewitching mix of evil and charisma, and Suzanne Stone is a person we recognize in everything from reality TV to national politics (ahem, or both).

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Both the film and the novel were inspired by Pamela Smart, a teacher and wannabe TV personality who convinced a young man to kill her husband. But instead of telling this story straight, the film takes a very satirical look at our obsession with celebrity, fame and notoriety. Merely entertaining when it was released over ten years ago, in our celebrity-entrenched culture, To Die For is a pointed take on a very interesting phenomenon, the desperate need for fame at any cost.

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The Spotlight

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***There is a good chance there will be a writers’ strike via the WGA (Writer’s Guild of America) according to Variety Magazine.*** (H/T Tari Jordan)

Move ticket prices are getting higher, and Hollywood Reporter tells us why.

Summer of 2017 movie preview courtesy of Entertainment Weekly.

Women directed films that are must-sees in 2017!

Geena Davis celebrates the 25th anniversary of A League of Their Own’s release.

Salma Hayek’s Beatriz at Dinner sounds like my kind of film, one that connects with my “Power to the People” mindset.

Talent agent Sandy Gallin dead at 76.

New documentary Jeremiah Tower: The Last Magnificent celebrates the eminent chef and his connection to California cuisine and the renowned restaurant Chez Panisse.

Will Netflix end its mail order DVD service in the age of streaming?

Director John Waters new summer camp for adults, Camp John Waters.

 

 

 

 

Reel Women: Female Film Directors Past and Present

“If there’s specific resistance to women making movies, I just choose to ignore that as an obstacle for two reasons: I can’t change my gender, and I refuse to stop making movies.” – Kathryn Bigelow

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In 2010, Kathryn Bigelow, the director of the critically-acclaimed film, The Hurt Locker, made history when she became the first women to win the Oscar for best director. She’s also a slew of other directing awards including the very prestigious Director’s Guild of America award for best director.

In honor of Ms. Bigelow I’ve decided to dust off a feature I initially wrote about women film directors from the silent era to the modern age way back in college, and posted on a defunct blog ending it with Ms. Bigelow’s triumph. I’ve updated this piece to reflect women film directors as of 2017. Enjoy!

As anyone to name a film director and most likely you’ll hear the names Spielberg, Scorsese, Coppola, Cameron and Tarantino. It is rare that the first name you hear is a woman’s. Why is this? Well, men do dominate the film industry. And mostly men have won the best director Oscars…Kathryn Bigelow being the only anomaly. Or maybe we haven’t had a slew of women directors being nominated for directing Oscars (let alone winning) because only recently have women gone behind the scenes to direct movies and need time to catch up to the big boys. Well, not exactly.

Women have been a part of Hollywood since the silent movie era. Many of these women, like Mary Pickford and Lillian Gish, are known for their work in front of the camera. However, women have been calling the shots behind the scenes since before the advent of the “talkies” in the late 1920s. They worked as producers, editors, screenwriters, and yes, directors. Many of these women held very creative and influential positions. One of the highest paid directors of the silent era was a woman. Furthermore, women directors were not afraid to make socially-conscious films.

Just as many actresses like Barbra Streisand and Penny Marshall have turned their talents to directing so did actresses of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Film noir actress, Ida Lupino, directed both films and TV shows in the 1950s and 1960s. And she wasn’t afraid of focusing her camera lens on controversial issues.

So far very few women have been nominated for directing a feature film. These women include Lina Wertmuller, for the Italian language film Seven Beauties (1975), Jane Campion for The Piano (1993), Sophia Coppola for Lost in Translation (2003), winner Kathryn Bigelow for The Hurt Locker (2009).

The following a just a few notable female film directors and their work.

Silent Era to 1930-Alice Guy Blaché 

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Parisian-born Alice Guy Blaché (1875-1968) was the first female film director in the history of film making. She was also the first director, male or female, to bring narrative film to the silver screen. From 1896 to 1920 Ms. Guy Blaché directed over 400 films. She made her first full length film, The Life of Christ, in 1906. The Life of Christ was a big budget epic that included 300 extras. That same year, her film La Fee Printemps (The Spring Fairy) was one of the first films to be shot in color. In fact, many of her films used a great deal of the best special effects of that time period.

Ms. Guy Blaché was the first woman to own and run her own film studio, the Solax Studio in Fort Lee, New Jersey. After Solax stopped producing films, Ms. Guy Blaché went to work for William Randolph Hearst’s International Film Service.

By the early 1920s, Ms. Guy Blaché stopped making movies, but that did not stop her from giving lectures on film making. She was pretty much forgotten by film historians until she published her memoirs in 1976.

Some other films by Ms. Guy Blaché:

The Cabbage Fairy (1896)

The Dangers of Alcohol (1899)

A Fool and His Money (1912)

A House Divided (1913)

Dream Woman (1914)

The Divorcee (1919)

Tarnished Reputations (1920)

1930 to 1950-Dorothy Arzner

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Born in California, Dorothy Arzner (1897-1979) directed seventeen films between 1927 and 1943. She was the only female director to work with the major actresses of her day, including Rosalind Russell, Joan Crawford and Katharine Hepburn. In fact, Ms. Arzner’s 1933 film, Christopher Strong, was the first film to bring the legendary Katharine Hepburn to public awareness.

Though Ms. Arzner initially wanted to work as a doctor, she soon turned her ambitions to movies. She began her career with Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, the parent company of Paramount. After starting out as a typist, Ms. Arzner soon climbed the ranks to screenwriter, and then editor. One of the most famous films she edited was Rudoph Valentino’s Blood and Sand. She was able to leverage this work into directing her first features Fashions for Women and Get Your Man in 1927.

Ms. Arzner’s success as a director lead her to direct one of the first “talkies,” The Wild Party featuring “It Girl” Clara Bow. And between 1927 and 1932, she made eleven features for Paramount until striking out on her own as an independent film director.

As a director, Ms. Arzner tackled many thorny topics including working women and female independence. Her work was often seen as melodramatic, but did reflect on women’s roles both in the home and outside in ways that films directed by men did not.

Ms. Arzner stopped directing movies in 1943. However, she did direct commercials for Pepsi and taught filmmaking at UCLA in the 1960s. And there are reports that director Todd Haynes wants to do biographic on Ms. Arzner’s life and how she affected motion pictures.

Some other films directed by Ms. Arzner:

Anybody’s Woman (1930)

Working Girls (1931)

Merrily We Go to Hell (1932)

Craig’s Wife (1936)

The Bride Wore Red (1937)

Dance, Girl, Dance (1940)

First Comes Courage (1943)

1950 to 1970-Ida Lupino

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Ida Lupino (1918-1995) was born in London and was encouraged by her parents to enter show business. She got her start as an actress. She mainly played tough yet sympathetic characters, and jokingly referred to herself as a “poor man’s Bette Davis.” Some of Ms. Lupino’s most notable roles were in the movies Drive by Night and High Sierra. In 1947, she left the studio system to become a freelance actress. Soon after Ms. Lupino began to focus her talents to behind the camera. Her first directing job came about when Elmer Clifton fell ill during the filming Not Wanted. Not only did Ms. Lupino end up directing the movie, she also shared writing credit.

Not content to direct what we’d call “chick flicks,” Ms. Lupino often directed tough action films. Her films also focused on controversial themes like rape, unwed motherhood and bigamy. She had her own production company and often directed films with no big name stars or huge monetary support from the studios. Her films were the precursor of independent cinema.

In the 1950s Ms. Lupino began to direct TV shows, including The Fugitive, Gilligan’s Island and Bewitched. She was the only woman to direct an episode of The Twilight Zone. In the 1970s, Ms. Lupino returned to acting in small roles. Of women working behind the scenes, she claimed, “I’d love to see more women working as directors and producers. Today it’s almost impossible to do it unless you are an actress or writer with power…I wouldn’t hesitate right this minute to hire a talented woman if the subject matter was right.”

Some other films directed by Ida Lupino:

Outrage (1950)

Hard, Fast and Beautiful (1950)

The Bigamist (1953)

The Hitchhiker (1953)

The Trouble With Angels (1996)

1970 to the Present-Kathryn Bigelow

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Born in 1951 in San Carlos, California, Kathryn Bigelow started her career out as an artist. She worked as a painter, and later got her Master’s degree in film at Columbia where she studied mainly film theory and criticism. She worked briefly as a professor until turning to film directing.

Bigelow’s first film was a 20-minute short called The Set Up. In this film two men fight each other while two others provided voice commentary about the images they are watching. Bigelow’s first full-length feature was a biker movie The Loveless (1982), which she co-directed with Monty Montgomery.

Bigelow has directed both film and TV. Some of her television credits include the notable drama Homicide: Life on the Streets (1997-1998) and the mini-series Wild Palms (1993). Probably one of the most popular of her movies is the action-packed Point Break (1991) starring Keanu Reeves and the late Patrick Swayze.

Bigelow has won widespread critical acclaim for the Oscar-nominated The Hurt Locker, a movie set in Iraq about bomb diffusers. Made on a minuscule budget with mostly unknown actors, Bigelow won a much deserved best directing Oscar on March 7th, 2010.

Bigelow has been considered an anomaly of female directors because her movies often focus on action and suspense, not romance and relationships like the films of the late Nora Ephron or Nancy Myers.

Other films by Kathryn Bigelow:

Near Dark (1987)

Blue Steel (1990)

Strange Days (1995)

The Weight of Water (2000)

K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)

Zero Dark Thirty (2012)

Women continue to make in-roads as film directors. A few names are Allison Anders (Grace of My Heart), Lone Sherfig (An Education), Tamara Jenkins (The Savages) and Mira Nair (The Namesake), Amma Assante  (the soon-to-be-release Where Hands Touch), Oscar-winning documentary film maker Caroline Waterlow (OJ in America) and the late Nora Ephron (When Harry Met Sally, Julia and Julie). And Ava DuVernay directed the Oscar-nominated Selma (2014) but wasn’t nominated for a best director Oscar, which didn’t sit well with a lot of people including me.

And just like Ida Lupino and Penny Marshall, actresses are also sitting in the director’s chair. A few of these include Jodie Foster, Angelina Jolie, Sarah Polley, Julie Delpy, Drew Barrymore, Lena Dunham, and the late Adrienne Shelly.

There are countless women now directing films that I couldn’t possibly name them all, but I look forward to learning their names and about their work.

Retro Reels: A Face In the Crowd (1957)

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Directed by the legendary Elia Kazan, and with a spot-on script by Budd Schulberg, A Face in the Crowd was not a huge hit when it first came out. Yet, in the sixty years since its release, A Face in the Crowd has proven to be quite prophetic with its relevant fusion of personality, media and politics.

Andy Griffith, in a stunning performance, plays Lonesome Rhodes, a drunken ne’er do well who is drying out in an Arkansas jail. He is discovered by Marcia Jeffries (Patricia Neal) a local radio reporter. She is at the helm of a show called “A Face in the Crowd” and when she finds out Lonesome can sing, she singles him out for her radio program. Not only can Lonesome sing, he’s also a charismatic speaker, filled with folksy, down home charm.

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Before long Lonesome becomes one of the show’s most popular stars. What’s next? Why, television, of course, which at the time was the hot new medium. Lonesome kills on the first night, even helping a homeless family by raising money. Lonesome goes from being a nobody to a huge celebrity in a flash. And not only does Lonesome become a celebrity, he also becomes an advertising pitch man, opinion-making seer, and political kingmaker. Men want to be him, and women want to be with him. Even Marcia finds herself drawn romantically to Lonesome against her better judgment.

It’s not long before Lonesome’s success and sense of power goes to his head. He has enough sway with the American audience that he can influence everything from the vitamins they ingest to the political ideas they hold in their head. However, Lonesome isn’t exactly appreciative of his fawning fans, and he is quite contemptible of them when not on TV. Yet, the audience sees him as this wise “just folks” character that truly cares about them. Sadly, Lonesome is lazy, corrupt and unethical, and gets worse as he becomes more successful. Off-camera, Lonesome takes advantage of women, breaking their hearts (including Marcia’s), and continues to drink himself into oblivion.

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It all becomes too much for Marcia and the rest of the people who work on Lonesome’s TV show, which include Walter Matthau as Mel Miller, a nebbish-like script writer. Wanting to put an end to reveal Lonesome’s real personality, Marcia has the contemptible comments Lonesome makes about his audience (he calls them morons and idiots) audible to the people watching his show. Will Lonesome’s fans stick with him or turn against him? And is just possible that Lonesome will be replaced by someone else waiting in the wings?

As I mentioned Andy Griffith is amazing in his first film role. It’s hard to believe that he would become the kindly Andy Taylor of the The Andy Griffith Show just a few years later, or a few decades later, the wise lawyer on Matlock. Patricia Neal is also perfect as Marcia Jeffries, betrayed both romantically and professionally by Lonesome. Yet, this is no bitter careerist. She also takes responsibility for creating a TV monster.

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A Face in Crowd is just a meaningful today as it was back in 1957. In fact probably more so since the advent of tabloid journalism, cable news networks and gossipy websites like TMZ and Perez Hilton. A folksy politician can have nothing to say but get away with saying it all the time, you betcha. People are famous just for being famous receive record deals, movie roles, television shows, their own fashion lines and countless magazine covers. And I would be remiss not to mention the current resident of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue is a former reality TV star. Will it ever end or was a movie like A Face in the Crowd only the beginning?